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Persimmon Vinegar

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Persimmon Vinegar (click here for recipe with metric measurements)

This recipe, was offered by Euell Gibbons in his 1962 book, "Stalking The Wild Asparagus".  Euell Gibbons basically follows his Persimmon Beer recipe, but with a slight modification shown below.  This recipe is used by permission.

Ingredients:

10 pounds of wheat bran
1 gallon of pulp from very ripe persimmons

Bake this mixture like pones of cornbread until it is brown and firm.  Break the pones into small pieces and put through a food chopper using a coarse plate.  Dump the ground mixture into a 5 gallon crock and fill the crock not quite full of boiling water.  

As soon as the crock cools to the point of barely being warm, stir in 1 package of dry yeast mixed with a little of the liquid from the crock.  Keep the crock covered with a cloth.  It will ferment furiously for a few days but keep watching it and in about a week it will start settling down.  

The moment it becomes still and clear, carefully siphon it off and add one gallon of unpasteurized cider vinegar to the entire batch.  The "mother" from the cider will aid in the production of the vinegar.  Keep in a warm place in gallon jugs, each plugged wit a wad of cotton.  The vinegar fermentation will happen rapidly and the vinegar will be ready for use within a few weeks.  

Under the right conditions, the jugs may develop additional "mother".  Mother is basically cloudy looking vinegar, perhaps even forming a jelly-like body.  Mother is mostly cellulose, a byproduct of the vinegar producing bacteria.  It is harmless.  You may decant the vinegar (leaving the mother behind) into new jugs, or just let it settle.  Vinegar keeps a long time.  During long storage, sediments and / or color changes may occur.  These are aesthetic and should not affect the flavor.  Well-developed and aged vinegar mothers
are very important for good-flavored vinegar.  If yours forms, it can be used to make additional batches of vinegar without the need for the cider vinegar seeding in the recipe. 

Persimmon Vinegar (metric measurements)

This recipe, is from Euell Gibbons in his 1962 book, "Stalking The Wild Asparagus".  This recipe is used by permission.

Ingredients:

4.54 Kg of wheat bran
1 L of pulp from very ripe persimmons

Bake this mixture like pones of cornbread until it is brown and firm.  Break the pones into small pieces and put through a food chopper using a coarse plate.  Dump the ground mixture into a 18.93 L crock and fill the crock not quite full of boiling water.  


As soon as the crock cools to the point of barely being warm, stir in 1 package of dry yeast mixed with a little of the liquid from the crock.  Keep the crock covered with a cloth.  It will ferment furiously for a few days but keep watching it and in about a week it will start settling down.  

The moment it becomes still and clear, carefully siphon it off and add one gallon of unpasteurized cider vinegar to the entire batch.  The "mother" from the cider will aid in the production of the vinegar.  Keep in a warm place in gallon jugs, each plugged wit a wad of cotton.  The vinegar fermentation will happen rapidly and the vinegar will be ready for use within a few weeks.  

Under the right conditions, the jugs may develop additional "mother".  Mother is basically cloudy looking vinegar, perhaps even forming a jelly-like body.  Mother is mostly cellulose, a byproduct of the vinegar producing bacteria.  It is harmless.  You may decant the vinegar (leaving the mother behind) into new jugs, or just let it settle.  Vinegar keeps a long time.  During long storage, sediments and / or color changes may occur.  These are aesthetic and should not affect the flavor.  Well-developed and aged vinegar mothers
are very important for good-flavored vinegar.  If yours forms, it can be used to make additional batches of vinegar without the need for the cider vinegar seeding in the recipe. 


Bibliography:

Gibbons, Euell. 1962. Stalking the Wild Asparagus. pp. 164-169.  $17.50 from Alan C. Hood & Co., Inc. (www.hoodbooks.com), used by permission.