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Mitchell Family Persimmon Pudding 

(a Mitchell Family Recipe, c. 1850)

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Picture of branch with persimmons
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Mitchell Family Persimmon Pudding (a Mitchell Family Recipe, c. mid-1800s) (click here for recipe with metric measurements)  

This recipe was sent in by by Danville, Indiana artist, author, and illustrator Kerry Trout (formerly Kerry Cook).  It has been handed down in the Mitchell Family since around 1850. Kerry writes, "I got this recipe from my grandmother, Leota (Mitchell) Miller. She got it from her mother, Ida (Scott) Mitchell, born 1874. The recipe was handed down to Ida Mitchell from her mother, Nancy (Pritchett) Scott. The Mitchell Family has lived in Hendricks County, Indiana since the 1840s. Ida's father Charles Mitchell was born in Mitchell, Indiana


Ingredients:Mitchell Family Persimmon Pudding (c. 1850) with whipped cream!

2 cups persimmon pulp (one pint) 
2 eggs
1 Cup white sugar
4 Cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking soda
6 Cups milk
1 Tablespoon butter


Directions:

1. Preheat the oven to 350 
°F.

2. In a large bowl, stir together the persimmon pulp and eggs using a whisk. Stir in sugar. In another bowl, combine the flour and baking soda. Stir this dry mix into the persimmon alternating with milk until smooth. Pour into a large greased crock or casserole dish. Drop dabs of butter on top.

3. Bake for 2-2.5 hours in the preheated oven, stirring every 15 minutes. The pudding will be a thick, dark brown when finished (see photo). Its a Thanksgiving favorite, hot or cold!
Kerry's grandmother's persimmon pudding spoon.
Kerry adds, "My grandmother (Leota Miller) had this hand-carved wooden spoon that was very special to her. She hung it on her kitchen wall, and used it only to stir her persimmon pudding. I imagine it was either her mother's or grandmother's, so she only used it anymore for that reason. I now have the spoon, and hang it like she did, and of course, use it only to stir my persimmon pudding. It looks ancient. (see photo)

Kerry also notes, "Some people choose not to stir the pudding, and it comes out in a cake-like consistancy -- like a dense brownie. So stirring every 15 minutes keeps it from becoming a cake. Plus, when stirring, it is necessary to scrape the side of the bowl too."

And on November 25, 2007 she added, "My 72 yr old uncle Don Miller (who is Leota's son) ate it here on Thanksgiving Day and he said it was perfect. He told me a friend brought him some last week and it was pale in color, and he said it just didn't compare to the old recipe he grew up on. (I always set aside extra pudding for Don to take home for later.)
 
My mother, Doris Jean (Miller) Cook, who is now deceased, made it a point to go out to find persimmons after the first frost. Mom could spot a persimmon tree a mile away."


Mitchell Family Persimmon Pudding (a Mitchell Family Recipe, c. mid-1800s) (metric measurements)

This recipe was sent in by by Danville, Indiana artist, author, and illustrator Kerry Trout (formerly Kerry Cook).  It has been handed down in the Mitchell Family since around 1850. Kerry writes, "I got this recipe from my grandmother, Leota (Mitchell) Miller. She got it from her mother, Ida (Scott) Mitchell, born 1874. The recipe was handed down to Ida Mitchell from her mother, Nancy (Pritchett) Scott. The Mitchell Family has lived in Hendricks County, Indiana since the 1840s. Ida's father Charles Mitchell was born in Mitchell, Indiana


Ingredients:Mitchell Family Persimmon Pudding (c. 1850) with whipped cream!

480 ml persimmon pulp 
2 eggs
200 g white sugar
480 g all-purpose flour
10 ml baking soda
950 ml milk
15 ml butter


Directions:

1. Preheat the oven to177 
°C.

2. In a large bowl, stir together the persimmon pulp and eggs using a whisk. Stir in sugar. In another bowl, combine the flour and baking soda. Stir this dry mix into the persimmon alternating with milk until smooth. Pour into a large greased crock or casserole dish. Drop dabs of butter on top.

3. Bake for 2-2.5 hours in the preheated oven, stirring every 15 minutes. The pudding will be a thick, dark brown when finished (see photo). Its a Thanksgiving favorite, hot or cold!
Kerry's grandmother's persimmon pudding spoon.
Kerry adds, "My grandmother (Leota Miller) had this hand-carved wooden spoon that was very special to her. She hung it on her kitchen wall, and used it only to stir her persimmon pudding. I imagine it was either her mother's or grandmother's, so she only used it anymore for that reason. I now have the spoon, and hang it like she did, and of course, use it only to stir my persimmon pudding. It looks ancient. (see photo)

Kerry also notes, "Some people choose not to stir the pudding, and it comes out in a cake-like consistancy -- like a dense brownie. So stirring every 15 minutes keeps it from becoming a cake. Plus, when stirring, it is necessary to scrape the side of the bowl too."

And on November 25, 2007 she added, "My 72 yr old uncle Don Miller (who is Leota's son) ate it here on Thanksgiving Day and he said it was perfect. He told me a friend brought him some last week and it was pale in color, and he said it just didn't compare to the old recipe he grew up on. (I always set aside extra pudding for Don to take home for later.)
 
My mother, Doris Jean (Miller) Cook, who is now deceased, made it a point to go out to find persimmons after the first frost. Mom could spot a persimmon tree a mile away."